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Magic Safe Bank (Nickels Only)
by F.H. Griffith - HOBBIES Magazine - December, 1971

71-12.JPG (13562 bytes)

Once again we are pleased to be in position to pass along information on a new find in a mechanical bank. This is the Magic Safe, pictured herewith, and it is made to use with nickels only. Please refer to HOBBIES for May 1969 and the article on the Magic Safe which was made to use with English pennies. At the time, the English penny version was the only type of the Magic Safe known to the writer. Now we have one made to use with nickels.

The bank shown is in reasonably nice paint condition and completely original with no repairs. It is an overall red with the door an iridescent type red. On the door, the name, the Indian Head nickel, and wording below are in a silver-gold. Wording on the top and two sides is in white. When the door is open, Figure 2, the numbered amounts of money are in red on a cream color background.

The bank operates the same way as its companion made for the English market — a nickel pushed in the slot, center top, causes the door to spring open automatically as shown in Figure 2.

Both banks were made in Germany, one for the English trade and the one under discussion for the American market. Other than general appearance and having the same name and operation, there are considerable differences between the two banks. Most notable on the American version is the Indian Head or Buffalo nickel dated 1917 on the door. Under this appears the following:

IF YOU HAVE A MIND TO SEE
WHAT GREAT SUMS IN THIS MAY BE
PUT A NICKEL IN THE SLOT AND
YOU’LL SEE WHAT YOU HAVE GOT

Along the coin slot is "5 CENTS." The wording on the sides of the bank is the same as on the English version with one exception. Where the number 6410 appears on the English, the number is 6412/5 on the American. The inside coin tube is smaller in order to fit the nickel properly. And, of course, where English coin amounts are shown on the one using the English penny, the coin amounts on the American type are from 50 cents up to $2.00.

Now, the writer is faced with somewhat of a dilemma — is the bank under discussion a "Type" bank or a variation? Is it a different bank since it was made for use in two different countries, plus all the other necessary differences to make it this way? This is the first time, so far as the writer is concerned, that a situation of this exact nature concerning a mechanical bank has occurred. While not yet decided, it will be.

—0—

NEW MECHANICAL BANK BOOK
(ILLUSTRATED)

The writer is pleased to advise you that his new illustrated mechanical bank book will be available at the time this appears. All known old authentic mechanical banks are pictured and graded individually. They are listed alphabetically and numbered accordingly. There are 297 mechanical banks in this new book, that’s an increase of 42 banks over the 1966 booklet.

In addition, there is a considerably increased section on variations and a section on all known fakes.

So we finally have permanent numbers for each mechanical bank. Some of the mechanicals are shown for the first time in any publication and it is the first time that all are shown in a single publication.

To obtain a copy of this new book please see the writer’s ad in this department.

 

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